Land Rover Defender Repairing the Forward Structure and Seat Belt Mounting

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 175 HDG Front Seat Belt Mount Bracket with Fixings – LR Defender 2/3 Door
1no. 122 Front of Rear Tub Repair – LR Defender 2 or 3 Door
1no. 1903 100mm x 1mm x 10m Single Sided Foam Tape

 

Corrosion around the front of the rear tub and its seat belt mountings could have disastrous consequences in an accident. Steve Miller explains the fix.

Corrosion really can take hold of our Land Rover’s body parts, especially after a few year’s hard graft.  After replacing the rear body tub’s floor structure last month, I now need to address the rest of my Ninety’s rear tub issues, especially around the safety-critical seatbelt mounting areas.  Repairing these will ensure its structural integrity and offer safer motoring for many more years to come.

The main issue is where any steel parts come directly into contact with aluminium.  On a rear tub such as this, more concerning area is around the seatbelt anchor points.  Originally, a piece of angled steel is bolted to the underside of the tub with captive bolts coming up through the aluminium tub so the inertia seatbelt reels can be fitted.  Again, the seatbelt stalks are also bolted from the cab and into much larger angled steel plates on the underside.

Over time, the two dissimilar metals react with one another.  In the worst case, and in the event of an accident, the additional strain on the seatbelt could cause the entire seatbelt reel to pull through the floor.

In order to carry out these repairs with the rear tub fitted to the vehicle, you would need to remove the seatbox from the vehicle to gain access.  With the extensive repairs needed on this particular truck, it has been made all the easier having all parts, including the rear tub removed.

Safety note

Gloves were worn throughout the cutting, drilling and fitting to protect from swarf, sharp edges and tool slips.  They are not seen in the pictures due to working alone (socially distanced) and continually setting up the camera and timer for the illustrations. Always wear thick gloves when working with metal.

Steps

1

I spy corrosion

Looking from the underside, these brackets fix through the floor to the seatbelt inertias.  Once you’ve unbolted the inertias, these will fall off.

2

Safety-critical and very weak

Although this looks fairly bad, I have seen a lot worse.  Thank goodness parts are available to add in extra strength, especially around the seatbelt anchorage.

3

Another bit for the scrap pile

This bracket will also need unbolting as it’s no longer needed.  This captive plate is what holds the seatbelts stalks in place.  It’s also bolted to the upstand.

4

Only spanner work

The heads of these bolts may have a plastic cover on them which needs removing to reveal the head. Keep these safe, you’ll need them later on.

5

What’s lurking behind?

Due to the amount of oil built up from a leaking transmission, the metalwork has stood up very well, with no obvious signs of furry aluminium.

6

Nothing to see here

It’s not uncommon to see this area totally rotted through but, in this case, all is well.  There is a benefit from oil leaks, sometimes!

7

Time for a clean up

Whilst most of the corrosion was still attached to the steel brackets, a quick wire brush-up cleans the area ready for the new parts.

8

Nice and Shiny

Part number 175WF is the two replacement repair panels which are supplied in galvanised steel.  These will literally last for years.

9

Into position

There panels are perfectly made and, at first, seemed a tight fit until I learnt the knack of getting them in and out.  Temporarily fitted in position here.

10

Aligned for seatbelt stalks

The new galvanised sections come with the captive nuts already in place.  The trick is to line them up with the holes already in the rear tub.

11

A story of two halves

Part 122 is the aluminium panels which locate behind the seats.  They’re supplied in two halves as it’s impossible to fit as one.  Again, fitted temporarily for now.

12

Alignment Issues

Using the pre-existing holes as a datum (two at the top), I mark on the back of part 122 with a marker pen before drilling with an M8 drill bit.

13

Tricks of the trade

With no obvious datum points to work with on the other side due to excessive corrosion, knowing where to match drill into part 122 was a mystery, so…

14

A template in hand

…Fortunately, I could utilise my now drilled example on the right-hand side, and then put this back to back with the one on the left…

15

Like so

…Making sure you have these the correct way around, you can create a mirror opposite, and then mark and drill once again with an M8 drill.

16

Clear location

With part 122 back in place, it’s clearer as to where the holes go, and they’ll line up nicely with the fixed studs on the new galvanised part.

17

Remember those bolts?

It’s now time to fix the seatbelt stalk bolts through part 122 and into the captive nuts on part 177WF, holding everything in place ready for match drilling.

18

You know the drill

There are around the 24 M8 holes to drill each side if you choose, although you want to ensure you’re only drilling into solid aluminium, not the corroded stuff.

19

Final fit for parts 122

These two panels need a row of 5 mm holes drilling along the angled edge.  These can be done either before or after drilling the M8 holes.

20

Riveting fun

Pop rivets can then be used along this edge which will ensure they’re fixed for good.  Just make sure nothing moves if you’ve already drilled the M8 holes.

21

Prevent future corrosion

I now need to remove the galvanised steel plates one last time.  I’m using single-sided foam tape as a barrier between the two dissimilar metals.

22

Completely covered

Ensuring that the steel surface is completely covered, I remove the yellow paper backing to reveal the foam.  This will prevent any future corrosion.

23

Final Fix

Using some black waterproof sealant, I run a bead around the edges to prevent future water ingress. I’m ready to offer up the steel sections one last time.

 

24

Bolt action

Having managed to use all 24 M8 bolts each side, a quick nip up with a 13mm spanner and socket sees the job nearing completion.

25

Last bit of drilling

Using a 6mm drill bit, now there is just the row of holes to match-drill along the edge which bolts to the seatbox.

 

26

A job well done

It looks like a lot of bolts, but most will be hidden behind the seats/cubbybox.  Good to know it has added strength and additional safety to the Land Rover.

 

Working with the tub on the truck

In order to carry out these repairs with the rear tub fitted to the vehicle, you would need to remove the seatbox from the vehicle to gain access.  With the extensive repairs needed on this particular truck, it has been made all the easier having all part, including the rear tub removed.

This workshop was carried out by Steve Miller and can be found in September 2020 copy of LRM

Land Rover Defender 90 Replacing of Floor Structure

Parts used

Buy Parts
3no. 061A Underfloor Support Strutt HDG – LR Defender & Series 2/3
3no. 087A Rear Floor Support Top Hat – LR Defender 90 & Series 2 & 3 88″
1no. 103A Rear Tub Floor 2mm Mill Finish Aluminium – LR Defender 90
1no. 116 Rear Floor Support – LR Defender & Series
1no. 1001 Pk 100 Type A Rivet Grip Range 1.6mm – 6.2mm – (Alu Body/Stainless Stalk) 4.8 x 10
1no. 1002 Pk 100 Type B Rivet Grip Range 4.8mm – 11mm (Alu Body/Stainless Stalk) 4.8 x 15
1no . 1903 100mm x 1mm x 5m Single Sided Foam Tape

 

Steve Miller shows how to repair a corroded rear tub using basic tools and some perfectly-made repair sections

When we think about corrosion in Land Rovers, our minds often jump straight to the chassis, quickly followed by the bulkhead – the well documented areas of the rust. The thing is, these areas all have one thing in common – they’re made of steel and, over time, exposed to steel without any protective coating will rust.

It’s often said that Land Rovers don’t rust, because they’re made of aluminium. This, as a lot of owners of Series, early Ninetys and One Tens (and early Defenders) will know, is an urban myth. Its not uncommon to slightly dubious areas of paintwork and, on closer inspection, you may see a slight white powdery substance forming. This galvanic corrosion is often found when two dissimilar metals touch over a period of time. Steel and aluminium are the two main metals used to manufacture of our beloved vehicles. When Land Rover originally designed these cars, little consideration was given to the effects of galvanic corrosion. Basically steel wins, and eats the aluminium for breakfast.

Take the rear tub of my 1985 Ninety, for example. Looking from the underneath the tub, I could see the three underfloor struts running left to right (I had these replaced a few years ago), and these sit across the aluminium so-called top hat sections that run front to back. Together, these sections that run to back. Together, these sections form the load bay structure. Over time, the steel underfloor support struts have eaten into the aluminium.

These supports are fairly straightforward to replace. However, replacement of the three aluminium top hat sections running front to back is more involved. The issues occurred from manufacture, as no barrier was used between the conflicting metals. Once we replace these parts, and eliminate any future corrosion issues, well have a serviceable rear tub for many more years to come.

Steps

1

Making life easier

While its completely possible to undertake this work with the tub in situ, it’s a lot easier with it removed, especially as I have additional repairs to undertake

2

Working position

Initially, the best working position is with the tub stood on its rear end with some protection underneath it. Ensure it is completely stable before working.

3

Let’s make a start

I started by unbolting the three under-floor support struts which where galvanised replacement . There were no rivets to drill connecting to the top hats.

4

Dissimilar metals

At all nine points where the steel struts touched the aluminium top hat they’ve been eaten . New parts from YRM Metal Solutions will replace these.

5

Theshold

With the tub now correct way up, the rear threshold needs removing. Chances are, the screws need a good dose of WD40 to make undoing easier.

6

Exposed floor

With all floor coverings removed, the rivets and spot welds holding the floor panel down are exposed. I’ll be replacing the floor too, as its seen better days.

7

In the tub

Working my way around the edge, drilling the rivets with a 5mm drill bit. There were some steel rivets on the front that needed help from an angle grinder.

8

Lots of drilling

You’ll spend a fair bit of time drilling out rivets around the outer edge, and you can use a hammer and punch to knock them through

9

Found out

If you were keeping your original floor, you’d have to grind more carefully than this, but the floor is nearly ready to come out.

10

Making a hole

If the original floor is to be retained, then all the spot welds holding the top hats to the underside would also need drilling out.

11

Find the welds

To replace the rear floor support (YRM part 116), which is below the floor at the rear threshold position, use a wire brush to expose the spot welds for drilling.

12

More drilling

Your 5mm drill bit would have had quite a workout at this stage so it might be getting a little blunt. I used a couple on this project.

13

Hammer time

Once the spot welds are drilled, you’ll need to use hammer and bolster to help separate the floor support from the angled body mount.

14

New metal

With the old floor loosely in place, I could line up the new rear floor support section and clamp it in place using clamps at both ends.

15

Match drilling

Before match drilling the old spot-welded holes, it’s worth noting where the holes go for the door threshold (previously removed) so you don’t clash with rivets.

16

Squared up

I’d temporarily refitted the galvanised underfloor struts to straighten things up, though first I riveted the new rubber mounting spacers on by using this hand riveter.

17

Hard work

The hand riveter was tough going and I realise that I needed to borrow a mate’s air riveter. That was far easier – there’s no going back now!

18

Making light work

An absolute doddle with the use of an air riveter. Here using Type C countersunk rivets to ensure the new floor will sit flush against the support section.

19

Coming together

With the three new top hats placed into position, ensuring that the joggled end sits underneath the rear floor support, its time to drill through.

20

Completing the structure

Now they are riveted on from the tub side, as seen here. I also removed the bolts on the floor support members to match-drill through the new floor.

21

New floor panel

The beautiful mill-finish aluminium 2mm thick floor I snow laid in position and the protective coating peeled back – very satisfying. I won’t want to scratch it.

22

And finally

To secure the floor, a lot more drilling is required, match drilling from behind using the existing holes down the wheel arch edges, then riveting in place from the tub side. It’s worth making sure you drill and rivet as you go, rather than drill all the holes in one as you’ll find that each time a rivet goes in, it’ll pull up, and eventually your pre-drilled holes will no longer line up. Lastly, whenever steel touches aluminium, it’s worth bearing in mind that a gasket needs to be made up. Do this by purchasing a roll of sticky-sided foam tape from YRM (part no 1903/5m), or you can use PVC insulation tape. Simply cut to size and stick

 

Working with the tub on the truck

With the tub fitted to the vehicle, extra care must be taken when drilling. For example, Td5 Defenders have their fuel tank fitted underneath the floor at the back, so make sure you don’t drill into the top of your tank! Also, extra measurements and data points will need marking up because you won’t necessarily know where to match drill through into the top hats. Using a straight edge will help between the data points.

This workshop was carried out by Steve Miller and can be found in August 2020 copy of LRM

Land Rover Defender Forward Facing Seat Conversion Kit

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 308 Rear Row Forward Facing Seat Conversion Kit – Land Rover Defender 90

Steps

1

Remove vertical and horizontal wheel arch supports. These are originally spot welded in place, these can be removed by drilling spot welds out  

2

Cut out the wheel arch section, to take the recess for the cover plate.

Using the below dimensions from image 3, 4 & 5

 

3

Measure in 85mm from the rear quarter panel then measure along 1075mm from the 85mm mark towards the front of rear tub for front cut out

4

Measure in 195mm from the outer skin  

5

Measure up 180mm from the floor  

6

Then insert the cover panel YRM 295 (LHS) & 296 (RHS) and put a rivet in all 4 corners (using rivets supplied) to hold cover panel in place.

You will need to use 4.9mm diameter drill bit to suit the rivets supplied

7

Arrows show rivets in corners, to hold the cover plate in place.  

8

Marking out the subframe position

Measure in 242mm (upto the red arrow, where the subframe first comes under the floor) from the rear body angle as shown

9

Hold the subframe (YRM 289) in position and match drill from the inside of the rear tub then rivet.

You may need to change the under floor supports to YRM 061A so they have the cuts to take the forward facing seats, image 10 shows under floor without cut

10

This shows a under floor support YRM 061B without the cut out for the subframe for the forward facing seat and rides on top of the nuts, you may require YRM 061A under floor support with cut outs  

11

Supplied with the kit is 2 tubes of seam sealer this is to be used on the internal and external joints, rivet heads and holes to stop any water engress

12

The workshop does not show the fitting of the rear seat belt to chassis anchors which are supplied with the kit (YRM 302 LHS & 303 RHS)

 

This workshop was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Snr & Peter Hardy

Series Front of Rear Tub Repair for 2 or 3 Door

Parts used

 2no. 260  Land Rover Series seat belt to chassis bracket
 1no 275 Series Land Rover Hard Top or Pick Up Front of Rear Tub repair panel
1001 The rivet will go through a material thickness from 1.6mm – 6.2mm grip range
1039 Land Rover Defender & Series Seat Box Stainless Steel Fixing Kit
1901 Single sided adhesive foam tape

Tools used

9 Selection of spanners and sockets set
Riveter
Drill and various drill bits
Tape measure and Marker
Bolster and Hammer
Appropriate PPE, Goggles, Gloves, Boots

Steps

1

Shows corrosion to front of rear tub.  

2

Seatbelts removed, damaged can be clearly seen.

3

Drill out the spot welds including the 2 on each side of the Series.

4

Lift fuel pipe up to aide fitting. Turn the repair sections 90 degrees; so the holes line up with fuel pipe

5

If the repair section is a tight fit you may need to remove 75mm – 80mm of each side to aide and improve alignment.

6

Add seat belt brackets for new panel alignment using pre-drilled holes.

Since this was workshop was done, the seat belt to chassis bracket is now available (YRM 266) in Stainless Steel.

7

Mark and drill holes (evenly spaced). Rivet YRM 275 to front of rear tub, if you have a compressor, an air rivet gun helps save a lot of time, as there a lot of rivets.  

8

When fitting the seat box, again mark and drill holes to bolt the seat box to the front of rear tub (fixing kit is YRM 1039) and use YRM 1901 to prevent the two dissimilar metals touching.

9

Wherever you have 2 dissimilar metals that come into contact, YRM would advise that you use a gasket. This helps to prevent corrosion and ultimately, improve the longevity of your vehicle.

 

Thanks to Alan Twigg for allowing us to use his photos for the workshop

Land Rover Defender 110 & 130 Side Frame Assembly Repair

Parts used

1no. 070 Land Rover Defender CSW & Series LWB Sill Rail LHS
1no. 071 Land Rover Defender CSW & Series LWB Sill Rail RHS
1no. 072 option B Land Rover Defender CSW & Series LWB B Post Repair Section LHS
1no. 073 option B Land Rover Defender CSW & Series LWB B Post Repair Section RHS
 1no. 074 Land Rover Defender CSW & Series LWB C Post Repair Section LHS
 1no. 075 Land Rover Defender CSW & Series LWB C Post Repair Section RHS

 

Note; Prior to commencing any work, take plenty of datums prior to commencing work. We made a template of the angle of the C Post as in Image no.9

Steps

1

Find the spot welds on the C Post, where its welded to the sill rail and vertical section of the C Post, do not cut it out as you will need to reuse the tabs on the vertical section of the C Post to reattach your repair section. 1 2 3

2

The spots weld have been drilled out, you may need to use a bolster chisel to break the weld to remove the C Post 4 5 6

3

The vertical section of the C Post has been removed with the tabs intact to reattach the new C Post. 7

4

Offer the vertical section and the C Post repair section together, then using a previous made template tack weld the C Post in place. 8 9

5

When your happy with the alignment of the C Post fully weld in place and dress. 10 11

6

Offer the new B Post up and measure where the inner frame of the B Post needs removing.  12

7

Cutting out the corroded B Post using a 1mm cutting disc, ready to weld the new one in  13 14

8

Butt joint and tack weld the replacement B Post in place and again before fully welding in place check the alignment and measurements.  15

9

After checking the alignment we have seam welded the joints and dressed off.  16 17

10

Remove the outer skin of the B Post, when doing this stagger the joint, this will make the B Post stronger and not give it any weak points. Then butt joint and weld the outer skin in place and dress  18

11

Having repaired all the B & C Post and using new YRM sill rails they are ready to reassemble.  19 20

12

Using the measurements taken at the start ensure they are assembled back in the same place. Image 21 form the B Post to end of sill rail was 882mm & Image 22 from inside of B Post to inside of C Post was 775mm. Don’t take this measurements as gospel, your best checking your own Defender prior to doing this.  21 22

 

This work was done having removed the Side Frame from the vehicle, this job can also be done leaving the B and C Post intact on the vehicle

This work was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Snr @ YRM

Land Rover Defender 90 Td5 onwards Rear Tank Cradle Replacement

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. YRM 118 Land Rover Defender 90 Fuel Tank Guard/Cradle Td5 onwards

Steps

1

Remove tow bar bracers and we have started to remove the fixings which hold the mild steel tank cradle to the chassis 1

2

Remove the fixings which hold the anti roll bar to the chassis (if you don’t have anti rolls bars ignore this) 2 3

3

Leave the anti roll bar attached to the axles and drop the anti roll which attaches to the chassis onto the floor to give to easy access for removing tank cradle. 4

4

There are 2 studs which fasten the tank cradle to the rear cross member remove the nuts. 5

5

Offer the new tank cradle in position, so it sits under the chassis, use a trolley and wood to hold the new tank cradle in position until its securely fixed. 6

6

Using the nuts and washers supplied, fasten the tank cradle to the rear cross member.  7

7

Offer the cup square bolts up to the chassis and finger tight when all the cup square bolts are in go around and tighten up, then refix the anti roll bar to the chassis, using the existing fixings or YRM product ref 1056  8 9

8

Shows the tank cradle fitted, with the tow bar still to fit.  10

 

Note, Best to carry this job out when your fuel tank in empty. To remove the existing tank cradle, out a crow bar inbetween the rear cross member and tank cradle so the studs come out the cross member, then you can either put a crow bar between the chassis brackets and cradle and prize the cradle across until the cradle is off the chassis, or you can cut the cradle where the cradle sits on the chassis so the cradle drops down.

This work was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Snr @ YRM

Defender, Discovery 1 & RRC Coil Spring to Series Axle Leaf Sprung Conversion Front & Rear

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. YRM 120 Series Land Rover Front Axle (Defender/Discovery 1/RRC Axle) Coil to Leaf Sprung Brackets
1no. YRM 121 Series Land Rover Rear Axle (Defender/Discovery 1/RRC Axle) Coil to Sprung Brackets

 

This is a conversion of a Discovery 1 Axle to fit on a Series 2 & 3 (but Defender & RRC can also be used)

Note; U-bolts used were standard 592182 Land Rover U-bolts except the modified one for the inside of the Front RHS

Steps

1

First job is to remove all the original bracket work from the Disco axles 1

2

Grind and clean up the casings ready for the new mounts 2 3

3

Support the front of the vehicle so the axle is clear of the ground 4

4

Loosely fit the Disco axle onto the spring with the new spring saddles (approx 13cm from rear of axle flange-outside face of spring saddle both sides) 5

5

Track rod needs to clear spring but only just.  Any more clearance and castor angle will be lost on swivel pins 6

6

Weld saddle in place and check measurements again before removing axle and fully welding saddles 7

7

Both sides approx 13cm from inside of axle flange to outside edge of new saddles  8 9

8

This is the problem on the drivers side. Due to the square profile of the casing around the diff, it is necessary to make up a strap U-bolt that can be shaped to suit the axle profile. I used 2 high tensile M12 threads and some 4mm strap. Also the profile of the saddle has to be filled (only the front edge) to fill the gap created by the shape of the axle  10

9

I also made a wedge for the top face of the axle so that the U-bolt/strap had a flat surface to sit on  11 12

10

The passenger side is far more straight forward and just requires careful measurement and welding on  13

11

The rear axle is far more straight forward as there are no steering arms to work with. I loosely fitted the axle same as the front and made sure the axle was centralised to the chassis. Rotate the axle until the diff nose is pointing slightly up from horizontal then tack welded the saddles in place. Then remove axle and fully weld saddles  14

12

This photo shows how 7.50/16 tyres just fit inside the standard series bodywork without any body mods  15

 

This work was carried out by Paul Marsden at Marsden Auto Developments, 07989 677452

Land Rover Defender Door Stainless Steel Kick Plate Fitting

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 093 Land Rover Defender Door Stainless Steel Kick Plate

Steps

1

The door prior to fitting kick plates where they are prone to being kicked and marked 1

2

The tools required (thinners & a rag) along with how you receive kick plate 2

3

Clean door card with thinners to remove any wax (through claening your Land Rover) this will allow the double sided tape to get a good adhesion 3

4

Door cards come with pre applied double sided tape, then remove film on double sided tape and fit to door card 4

5

Having fitted the kick ensuring it has a good grab of the door card, prior to removing film 5

6

Having removed film from door which reveals brushed stainless steel finish, then repeat process for other side  6 7

 

This workshop was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr

Land Rover Defender 90 Sill Panel Replacement

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 182 Land Rover Defender Sill Panel

Steps

1

The existing Sill Panel in place. 1

2

Where the bolts need removing and highlighted with an arrow the plastic clip to be removed 2 3

3

The existing Sill Panel removed 4

4

The new Sill panel in place using the stainless steel fixings provided ensuring the cleats fit to the rear of sill to ensuring easy fitting and the holes line up with body panels. Use the 35mm long bolts for the front and rear wing stays, the cup square bolts are to used in fixing sill to wheel are and 20mm long bolts to fix to sill rail. 5

5

The Sill Panel fitted. 6 7

 

Tips, when painting you will first require a etch primer then under coat and top coat.

This workshop was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr

Land Rover Battery Clamping Tray Kit

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 176 Land Rover Battery Clamp/ Tray

Steps

1

How you will receive your kit. 1

2

Offer the battery tray in place or in this instance the under seat tool box, the mark the position of the cup square holes 2

3

Having drilled holes to take an M6 Bolt and fitted cup square bolts, screw the threaded bar in place then tighten bolt in place. 3

4

Having fitted the battery offer the clamping bar in place. 4

5

Fix the clamping bar in place and terminals. 5

6

The clearance at the shallow end of the seat box.  6

 

Tips, if you fitting battery clamping tray to none aluminium surface leave the protective film in place to prevent electro static reaction.

This workshop was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr

Land Rover Defender 90, 110/130 Pick Up/Hard Top, Strike Plate Repair & Seat Belt Bracket Mount Repair Part B

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 122 Land Rover Defender 90 Seat Box/Bulkhead Repair Panel
1no. 175 Land Rover Defender Galvanised Front Seat Belt Mount Bracket
1no. 177 Land Rover Defender 90, 110/130 Hard Top/Pick Up Aluminium Strike Plate
1001 Type A Rivets Grip Range 1.6mm – 6.2mm Pk 100
1612 M8 30mm Fixing Kit Stainless Steel Pk 10

Tools used

9 Selection of spanners and sockets set
Riveter
Drill and various drill bits
Tape measure and Marker
Bolster and Hammer
Appropriate PPE, Goggles, Gloves, Boots

Steps

1

The corrosion on the rear tub. 1

2

YRM product ref 175 offered in place, then clamp it in place when positioned correctly and match drill to bolt it in place along the upstand section. When positioning the bolts ensure they go into un-corroded metal. 2

3

YRM 175 bolted in place, you only need to hand tighten bolts as it will need to be removed to fit YRM product ref 122. 3

4

YRM 122 cut in half as it is not possible to fit in one piece, then mark for the M8 stainless steel studs for the seat belt inertia reel and the bolts attached to YRM 175. 4

5

YRM 122 clamped and riveted in place. 5

6

YRM 175 re-fitted and bolted up ready to match drill along the top of the repair. 6

7

The repair sections being matched drilled to clamp them together.  7

8

The repairs finished ready to repeat the process for the other side, as this is for display purposes only we have not used seam sealer which is recommended to prevent water ingress.  8 10 9

 

This work was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr

Land Rover Defender LHS Under Seat Tool Box Replacement

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 021 Land Rover Defender Battery Box LHS **Now 25mm Deeper**
1001 Type A Rivets Grip Range 1.6mm – 6.2mm Pk 100
1002 Type B Rivets Grip Range 4.8mm – 11mm Pk 100

Steps

1

The nearside seat in position this will need removing along with the soundproof to gain access to tool box. 1

2

The seat and sound proof removed, to remove toolbox the spot welds will need drilling out and these can later be used to rivet the new toolbox in place. 2

3

Where the rivets/spot welds will need drilling out 3

4

The seat box has been removed, by removing sill rail. 4

5

Clamp the seat box in position and match drill were the spot welds were drilled out or rivets. 5

6

The seat box and seat box end has now been riveted in place and needs the sill rail bolting back in place  6

7

The toolbox will need match drilling to suit the seat box end to bolt it to the sill rail.  7

8

The clearance between the bottom of the tool box and chassis rail.  8

9

The under seat tool box fitted with the seat and sound proof refitted.  9

 

Note, when fitting toolbox back apply PVC tape where any dissimilar metals touch i.e. aluminium comes into contact with mild steel to prevent electro static reaction.

This workshop was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr

Land Rover Defender 90, 110/130 Pick Up/Hard Top, Strike Plate Repair & Seat Belt Bracket Mount Repair Part A

Parts used

Buy Parts
1no. 122 Land Rover Defender 90 Seat Box/Bulkhead Repair Panel
1no. 175 Land Rover Defender Galvanised Front Seat Belt Mount Bracket
1no. 177 Land Rover Defender 90, 110/130 Hard Top/Pick Up Aluminium Strike Plate
1001 Type A Rivets Grip Range 1.6mm – 6.2mm Pk 100
1612 M8 30mm Fixing Kit Stainless Steel Pk 10

Tools used

9 Selection of spanners and sockets set
Riveter
Drill and various drill bits
Grinder 110V
Tape measure and Marker
Bolster and Hammer
Appropriate PPE, Goggles, Gloves, Boots

Steps

1

The rear tub corrosion, caused by the electro static reaction between 2 dissimilar metals on the strike plate and the seat belt mount bracket. 1 3 2

2

Where I have highlighted the spot welds on the strike plate, these are to be drilled out using a 4.9mm Ø hole to suit our rivets so when fitting repair section the rivets fit. You will need to drill out spot welds well above where the repair section is going to finish to be able to cut the outer skin. 4

3

The spot welds have been drilled and a square line has been marked across as to where it needs cutting to remove all corroded metal. 5

4

The 2 skins on the strike having been separated using a chisel to split the 2 apart ready to cut, in this instance I used a grinder ensuring I wedged a piece of timber between the 2 skins as to not to damage the tub. 6

5

The outer skin removed and the upper outer skin straightened out using a metal block and hammer. Then measure the length you need to cut the repair section, the repair section provided is 470mm long. 7

6

The repair section measured and marked and ready to cut to length.  8

7

The repair section clamp in place then using the spot weld holes you earlier drilled out you can either match drill or mark and drill again using 4.9mm Ø drill.  9

8

The repair drilled and ready to fit. 10

9

The repair section fitted using non steel rivets. Then repeat the process for the other side. 11

10

Another repair done, thanks to David for letting us use his photos.  12 14 13

 

This work was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr

Click here to view Part B

Land Rover Defender/Series 2 & 3 Bulkhead Head Vent Panel Replacement

Parts used

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1no. 001A Land Rover Defender & Series 2 & 3 Extended Bulkhead Repair Panels
or 1no. 001B LHS Extended Bulkhead Repair Panel Defender & Series 2 & 3
1no. 001C RHS Extended Bulkhead Repair Panel Defender & Series 2 & 3

Steps

1

The amount of corrosion once the windscreen and frame had been removed, then all the rotten parts we removed, to start a fresh. 1 5 4 3 2

2

The extended bulkhead repair panels being temporally clamped in place, the repair panels will be now stitched welded or seam welded into place and dressed. 6 7

3

All the ancillary parts fitted ready for painting. 8

4

YRM product 001A fitted and painted. 9

 

Or you can cut a hole in the repair section to keep the vent panel in place.

Thanks to John for allowing us to use his photos for the workshop and the work was carried out by Northeast Land Rover Services.

Land Rover Discovery 1 Rear Tub Floor Assembly

Parts used

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1no. 029 Land Rover Discovery Rear Cross Member
1no. 046 Land Rover Discovery & Range Rover Classic Rear Floor Side Skirts
1no. 128A Land Rover Discovery Rear Under Floor Support Part A
1no. 128B Land Rover Discovery Rear Under Floor Support Part B
1no. 128C Land Rover Discovery Rear Under Floor Support Part C
1no. 189 Discovery 1 Rear Boot Floor

Steps

1

The rear tub prior to any work commencing. Picture no. 4 also shows a hole in the top half of the rear cross member, which was supplied separately upon request. Before removing any parts ensure you have taken plenty of datums/measurements so the new parts go back in the correct place. 1 4 3 2

2

Whilst the floor is out it’s an ideal time to do any repairs to the top of the chassis and apply a coat of undercoat and primer. 5

3

The top of the rear cross member removed and preparing it fitting by removing any paint to weld to the repair section in place. 6 7

4

The top half of the rear cross member sat in place prior to be welded in place to make sure it fits and is not catching on anything. 8

5

The side skirt has been cut and fitted, you can either use your existing side skirt to use as template to cut around rear wheel arch or if to corroded use some cardboard to make your template. When your happy with the position repeat process on other side (if you don’t need to replace the side skirt, we supply the Z section separately YRM product ref 046A). 9

6

The other side skirt fitted along with under floor supports sat in place along with rear cross member floor support, then sit the rear floor in place prior to any welding taking place to ensure that all parts fit.  10 11

7

When you are happy all the parts fit, start welding them in place.  12

8

Rear cross member, side skirts and rear floor supports have been welded in place and have been seamed sealed and paint to prolong life of parts.  13

9

The rear floor fitted and painted.  14 15

 

This work was carried out by Land Rover Enthusiast Simon Rees, who has kindly let us use his photos.

Land Rover Defender & Series 2 & 3 Door Repair Section

Parts used

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1no. 015 Land Rover Defender Door Repair Section
or 1no. 020 Series Land Rover 2 & 3 Door Repair Section

Steps

1

The door with the door card already removed. 1

2

A close up corroded area 2

3

When removing the corroded area , prise away the door skin using a bolster chisel a bit at a time until the whole door skin comes away from frame then mark up where you wish to remove door frame, the insert a piece of wood between frame and door skin to avoid cutting throught door skin when removing frame. 3

4

The amount of corrosion of the existing door frame. 4

5

The door frame fitted, mark the door repair section for the 45 degrees and cut to suit to fit what has been removed. Prior to fitting apply PVC tape between door skin and door frame to avoid electro static reaction. 5

6

The door repair section fitting and painted, when fitted drill 3 hole across the bottom at each end and centre with a 8mm diameter bit then fill wax oil to pro long the door repair section and to let rubbish out.  6 7

Land Rover Defender 90 & Series SWB Rear Tub Floor Assembly

Parts used

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3no. 061 Land Rover Defender 90/110/130 & Series SWB/LWB Underfloor Support Strutt
3no. 087 Land Rover Defender 90/Series SWB Rear Floor Support Top Hat
1no. 091 Land Rover Defender & Series 2 & 3 Rear Door Thresh
1no. 092 Land Rover Defender & Series 2 & 3 Rear Door Rubber Seal
 1no. 103 Land Rover Defender 90 & Series SWB Rear Tub Floor
 1no. 116 Land Rover Defender & Series Rear Floor Support
1001 Type A Rivets Grip Range 1.6mm – 6.2mm Pk 100
1002 Type B Rivets Grip Range 4.8mm – 11mm Pk 100

Tools used

9 Selection of spanners and sockets set
Riveter
Drill and various drill bits
Tape measure and Marker
Hammer and bolster chisel
Appropriate PPE, Goggles, Gloves, Boots

Steps

1

The rear tub prior to any work commencing. 1

2

The spot have located by using a wire brush and removing the paint then the rivets around the perimeter, if you are not bothered about keeping the floor they can be cut out using grinder or if you’re keeping it centre pop rivets and drill out. 2

3

The top hat has corroded through and wasn’t even fixed down. 3

4

The floor has been removed and you can get a better assessment of what needs replacing 4

5

The top hats and under floor supports have been removed by drilling out rivets and were they were attached to under floor supports to avoid drilling tank I used a bolster chisel. The rear floor support can also be removed by drilling out spot welds take plenty of measurements here so it goes back in the same place. 5 6

6

The under floor supports have been placed in position loosely and have had PVC tape put on ends to act as a barrier between the mild steel under floor support and aluminium wings to prevent electro static reaction. Then I used a straight edge to line the holes up to make it easier for fitting the top hats.  7 8

7

The top hat have been loosely put in place along with the rear floor support to be marked up for the rivets ensuring you don’t clash with door thresh fixing or previous holes, if you are fitting top hat to a series SWB they will need cutting down in lenght.  9

8

The rear floor support has been pre-drilled, and then offered into place ensuring it goes back in previous position. Then riveting back in place ensuring you don’t use mild steel rivets otherwise you’ll get electro static reaction.  10 11

9

Offer the top hat in place with the joggle to the rear door and mark were the top comes into contact with the under floor supports and then mark up the other 2 and apply PVC tape to prevent electro static reaction. 12 13

10

Offer in the top hat and match drill with the under floor support, if you don’t have your tank in the back then you can match drill from the underside. If your tank is in the rear put a piece of plate under the under floor support to prevent drilling through your tank, and then fit all 3. 14 17 16 15

11

Mark where you intend on fixing the floor in place then offer the floor in, then use a straight edge to mark, then drill and fix in place put 2 fixings in to start then drill the rest to prevent the floor from moving so the holes will line up, if fitting floor to a series SWB it will need cutting down in length.  18

12

The floor fixed in place then offer in rear rubber door seal and rear door thresh and match drill and fix.  19 20

 

This worked was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr.

Land Rover Defender Seat Box Lid Replacement

Parts used

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1no. 139 Land Rover Defender Seat Box Lid Kit

Tools used

25 Selection of spanners and sockets set
Riveter
Drill and various drill bits
Tape measure and Marker
Appropriate PPE, Goggles, Gloves, Boots

Steps

1

How you will receive your seat box lid kit. 1

2

The toolbox empty or your fuel tank maybe there. Next you need to transfer lines of the widest point of the seatbox opening to locate where the angles need positioning. 2 3

3

Sit the lid in position ensuring the seat box catch is located in the lid slot and transfer lines of opening onto aluminium lid. 4 5 6

4

Measure the width of the opening at the front and back to see if it parallel, also fit to the angle 5mm narrower so it’s not too tight for fitting. 7 8

5

The lines transferred around to the underside of the lid making sure the the marks are 5mm narrower than opening. 9

6

Measure back from the front of the toolbox compartment, then transfer these measurements onto the lid, this is so the angle doesn’t catch the seat box comparment.  10 11

7

Mark the angle were you are going to locate rivets using a 4.9mm diameter drill bit, then position and clamp the angle in place then drill through and remove any rag and rivet in position. 12 14 13

8

Repeat process for fitting angle on the other side.  15

9

Offer in place to make sure it fits.  16

10

Remove the bolts and measure cross centres to hold toolbox lid retainer, to stop the lid from rattling.  17 18 19

11

Mark and drill holes on lid retainer, they will need to be 7mm diameter holes to take the M6 bolts provided. Then bolt in place.  20 21

12

The angles are positioned differently here to accommodate different widths of the opening of the compartments.  22

13

Apply foam tape to the underside of lid around the outside of angles where the lid sits on the seat box compartment to kill any vibration noise. Then remove protective film from the lid and fit and repeat for the process for the other side.  23 24

 

This worked was carried out by Ronnie Maughan Jnr.

Land Rover Defender Under Seat Toolbox Replacement

Parts used

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